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Featured Objects

Aermacchi MB-339CB
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Aermacchi MB-339CB

NZ6460 (Manufacturer’s no. 6786)


The Government purchased 18 Aermacchis in 1990 to replace the RNZAF’s BAC Strikemaster aircraft, with deliveries beginning in April 1991. All 18 aircraft were operated by No.14 Squadron at Ohakea. The MB-339 provided RNZAF pilots with their introduction to fast jet operations, bridging the gap between the CT/4E Airtrainer, in which they had completed their initial pilot training, and whichever aircraft they went on to fly. The ‘Macchi’, as it became known in the RNZAF, also had a second-line attack capability when equipped with 12.7mm gunpacks, bombs and rockets. With the disbandment of the Air Combat Force in 2001, the RNZAF’s Aermacchi aircraft were retired and put into storage at Ohakea.

NZ6460 was the first Macchi to be assembled and test flown and was officially handed over to No.14 Squadron on 19 April 1991. On 28 November 1994 its pilot was forced to make a wheels-up landing at night following a ‘flame-out’ of the engine. A metal object had been ingested resulting in a complete loss of power shortly after take-off. The aircraft required extensive repair in Italy. As part of No.14 Squadron’s aerobatic display team, the Black Falcons, NZ6460 took part in many displays around New Zealand throughout 2000 in celebration of the new millennium. After being in storage since 2001, NZ6460 was transferred to the Air Force Museum of New Zealand in 2012 and is on display in the Conference and Events Hall.
Avro 652A Anson Mk.I
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Avro 652A Anson Mk.I

Composite airframe (display identity NZ406)


23 Ansons were supplied to the RNZAF in 1942-43 and were used in New Zealand for general reconnaissance and advanced navigational training. The last of the Anson fleet was retired from the RNZAF in 1952.

The aircraft on display is a composite aircraft made from many different Anson aircraft parts, although the fuselage is largely NZ415 (LT376). Parts of NZ410, NZ422 and VL352 are also used. The metal centre section, mainplanes and tailplane are from VL352, a late series Mk. 19.

For display purposes the aircraft is shown as NZ406 "G" of the School of General Reconnaissance, RNZAF Bell Block (New Plymouth), 1943. The aircraft is on display
in the Aircraft Hall.
BAC 167 Strikemaster Mk.88
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BAC 167 Strikemaster Mk.88

NZ6373 and NZ6374 (Manufacturer's no. 343 and 344)


The RNZAF requipped No. 14 Squadron at Ohakea with 10 British Aircraft Corporation Strikemaster aircraft in 1972 as the replacement for the De Havilland Vampires which were withdrawn from service that year. A further six Strikemasters were introduced into service in 1976. The Strikemaster was used as a jet conversion training aircraft for pilots progressing through to the Skyhawks of No. 75 Squadron. From 1976, however, all pilots completed training on this aircraft type regardless of later employment. Strikemaster aircraft were withdrawn from service in 1992 when they were replaced by the Aermacchi MB339.

NZ6373 is currently in storage in No. 3 Hangar at Wigram, and NZ6374 is on loan to Wanaka Warbirds and Wheels attraction at Wanaka Airport.
Bell UH-1H Iroquois
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Bell UH-1H Iroquois

US Army serial no. 69-15923 (displayed as NZ3800) (Manufacturer's no. AAB 12211)


Six UH-1D helicopters were purchased in 1965 and were delivered to New Zealand by RNZAF C-130 Hercules transport aircraft during 1966, and were allocated to No. 3 Battlefield Support Squadron at Hobsonville. Nine UH-1H helicopters were later delivered in 1970. The Iroquois is still in service today with No. 3 Squadron based at Ohakea, but are being gradually replaced by the NH90. These helicopters
are widely used in support of Army training, search and rescue, and have deployed overseas to Singapore, Bougainville, East Timor and Solomon Islands, as well as
deployments to Antarctica.

This aircraft on display at the Museum was donated by the US Army. Manufactured in 1970 it was initially assigned to the 507th Medical Company in Texas as a medical evacuation aircraft. It also served with the 163rd Aviation Company in Kentucky, and with the 5th Aviation detachment in Holland.

In 1992 the aircraft moved to the 207th Aviation Company in Heidelberg, Germany as a VIP transport. When the United States started its withdrawal from Germany in 1994, the aircraft was put on the disposal list, having flown a total of 4,852 hours. In 1995 it was offered to the Air Force Museum and was given the display identity of NZ3800 and was painted in the camouflage scheme in RNZAF use at that time. This aircraft is on display in the Aircraft Hall.