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#Matariki – Te tau hōu Māori / The Māori new year

Today is the first time Matariki is celebrated as a public holiday in Aotearoa New Zealand. Note that while we get 1 public holiday to acknowledge Matariki, the celebration itself is spread out over multiple days.

Matariki is the Māori name for a cluster of stars, also known as the Pleiades, which rises over Aotearoa in midwinter. For many Māori, the emergence of Matariki in the sky marks the start of the new year.

The crews of voyaging waka used constellations like Matariki to guide them on their journeys across the Pacific Ocean. Modern technology assists our Air Force with navigation today, but the skill of navigating using stars is still taught.

This cardboard planisphere from our collection has a rotating wheel that is set to the date and time of night, showing the stars if the viewer is located at Latitude 41°South, Longitude 174° East. It belonged to Flight Lieutenant Jack Edwin Dawber, who served during World War Two.

Find out more about Matariki here: matariki.net.nz

📸: Air Force Museum of New Zealand
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#Matariki  – Te tau hōu Māori / The Māori new year

Today is the first time Matariki is celebrated as a public holiday in Aotearoa New Zealand. Note that while we get 1 public holiday to acknowledge Matariki, the celebration itself is spread out over multiple days. 

Matariki is the Māori name for a cluster of stars, also known as the Pleiades, which rises over Aotearoa in midwinter. For many Māori, the emergence of Matariki in the sky marks the start of the new year. 

The crews of voyaging waka used constellations like Matariki to guide them on their journeys across the Pacific Ocean. Modern technology assists our Air Force with navigation today, but the skill of navigating using stars is still taught.

This cardboard planisphere from our collection has a rotating wheel that is set to the date and time of night, showing the stars if the viewer is located at Latitude 41°South, Longitude 174° East. It belonged to Flight Lieutenant Jack Edwin Dawber, who served during World War Two.

Find out more about Matariki here: matariki.net.nz

📸: Air Force Museum of New Zealand

Comment on Facebook

Le Pleiadi... simbolo della Subaru!

We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive. Invest in Cryptocurrencies through Mr Alfred, an expert in online trading and be sure of earning a massive profits by clicking on Mr Alfred and his trading team on Facebook www.facebook.com/Neumann.alfred226

The Air Force Museum of New Zealand was delighted to host the Christchurch Aerospace Challenge Awards yesterday.
It was fantastic that one of the birth places of Aviation in Aotearoa New Zealand hosted an event showcasing the future of aviation and beyond!

Learn more about the event here: newsline.ccc.govt.nz/news/story/christchurch-aerospace-challenge-winner-announced

📸: Aerospace Christchurch
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The Air Force Museum of New Zealand was delighted to host the Christchurch Aerospace Challenge Awards yesterday. 
It was fantastic that one of the birth places of Aviation in Aotearoa New Zealand hosted an event showcasing the future of aviation and beyond!

Learn more about the event here: https://newsline.ccc.govt.nz/news/story/christchurch-aerospace-challenge-winner-announced

📸: Aerospace Christchurch

On 19 April 1951, the ship SS Atlantis left Southampton, carrying 100 British women bound for New Zealand. These were not typical immigrants, however, but part of a tradition of personnel transferring between the RAF and RNZAF and vice versa, which still exists today.

The group had been recruited from serving and former members of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), the women’s element of the Royal Air Force. This was because after World War Two, the New Zealand version of the WAAF had struggled to maintain a sufficient level of recruitment and retention. The British women were carefully selected and encouraged by the opportunity of an exciting new career and life in Aotearoa New Zealand.

An RNZAF Flight Lieutenant attached to the High Commission in London wrote to Squadron Officer Lawson, Director of the WAAF in Wellington on 25 April 1951: “The girls when they left Southampton were extremely fit and were brimming with enthusiasm and the spirit of adventure”.

All went well until they arrived in Malta. One of the young women, LACW Josephine Bell, suffered a sudden blood clot, ending up in hospital and the ship had to leave without her. The hundred was now ninety-nine, and “the Ninety-Nine” became a nickname for the group in the RNZAF. After a long voyage, they reached Wellington on the evening of 5 June 1951 and after a visit to RNZAF Headquarters were taken to Woodbourne for their training before being posted to stations around the country and beginning their new lives. Further drafts from Britain also arrived during the 1950s to serve with the WAAF and, later the Women’s Royal New Zealand Air Force (WRNZAF).

📸: No. 1 Draft of ex-English WAAFs at RNZAF Station Woodbourne, circa June 1951. This group is commonly known as "The 99ers". Image ref MUS22013, Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Edit: We attached a different photo to this post previously, thank you to those who alerted us to this! 😉
... See MoreSee Less

On 19 April 1951, the ship SS Atlantis left Southampton, carrying 100 British women bound for New Zealand. These were not typical immigrants, however, but part of a tradition of personnel transferring between the RAF and RNZAF and vice versa, which still exists today.  

The group had been recruited from serving and former members of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), the women’s element of the Royal Air Force. This was because after World War Two, the New Zealand version of the WAAF had struggled to maintain a sufficient level of recruitment and retention. The British women were carefully selected and encouraged by the opportunity of an exciting new career and life in Aotearoa New Zealand.    

An RNZAF Flight Lieutenant attached to the High Commission in London wrote to Squadron Officer Lawson, Director of the WAAF in Wellington on 25 April 1951: “The girls when they left Southampton were extremely fit and were brimming with enthusiasm and the spirit of adventure”. 

All went well until they arrived in Malta. One of the young women, LACW Josephine Bell, suffered a sudden blood clot, ending up in hospital and the ship had to leave without her. The hundred was now ninety-nine, and “the Ninety-Nine” became a nickname for the group in the RNZAF. After a long voyage, they reached Wellington on the evening of 5 June 1951 and after a visit to RNZAF Headquarters were taken to Woodbourne for their training before being posted to stations around the country and beginning their new lives. Further drafts from Britain also arrived during the 1950s to serve with the WAAF and, later the Women’s Royal New Zealand Air Force (WRNZAF). 

📸: No. 1 Draft of ex-English WAAFs at RNZAF Station Woodbourne, circa June 1951. This group is commonly known as The 99ers. Image ref MUS22013, Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Edit: We attached a different photo to this post previously, thank you to those who alerted us to this! 😉

Comment on Facebook

Where are they now? I bet there some great stories from the group

Well done ladies

My mother was in this group. She served at the Whenuapai officers mess for a few years prior to meeting my father. Her name was Gwendolyn Buckly-Moss. She was my inspiration for joining in 1977.

I was 11year old and traveled with my parents on this trip to New Zealand . We though the poor woman had chronic sea sicknes, good to find out the real problem. I'm not certain but I think this was the last trip for the Atlantis it was broken up for scrap.

My Mum was one of the ‘99, l met quite a few of them,they had lots of reunions and kept in touch. Several woman had sons/daughters who also served in the RNZAF.

I wonder how many stayed on in NZ ?

Expect that there far more Women, than Men, in England after WW2?

We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive. Invest in Cryptocurrencies through Mr Alfred, an expert in online trading and be sure of earning a massive profits by clicking on Mr Alfred and his trading team on Facebook www.facebook.com/Neumann.alfred226

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Entry to the Museum is free, donations are appreciated.

45 Harvard Ave, Wigram, Christchurch | 03 343 9532

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