Skip to content
Free Admission
Open Daily 9.30am to 4.30pm
Home – 31 August 2021
Traffic Light Info

Kia ora - these are our entry requirements at Orange:

Wear a face covering

Wear a face covering

Scan in

Scan in

Present your Vaccine Pass

Present your Vaccine Pass

Follow on Facebook

Go to Facebook
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Who says an Iroquois can't be flash & comfortable? For the Queen, they can be! 👑☺️

Seen here is a view of the VIP seating fitted in a No. 3 Squadron Iroquois for the visit of Queen Elizabeth. Hobsonville, RNZAF Base Auckland.

Find more photos like this one in our online photo library ▶️ fotoweb.airforcemuseum.co.nz/fotoweb/archives/5003-Search-the-Collection/

📸: RNZAF Official, Ref WhG106-74 & WhG107-74
... See MoreSee Less

Who says an Iroquois cant be flash & comfortable? For the Queen, they can be! 👑☺️

Seen here is a view of the VIP seating fitted in a No. 3 Squadron Iroquois for the visit of Queen Elizabeth. Hobsonville, RNZAF Base Auckland.

Find more photos like this one in our online photo library ▶️ https://fotoweb.airforcemuseum.co.nz/fotoweb/archives/5003-Search-the-Collection/

📸: RNZAF Official, Ref WhG106-74 & WhG107-74

Comment on Facebook

Fancy ruffles!

Prep the royal m60 good sir Her majesty wishes to lay waste

A bit lace around top of the cabin,a couple of nice cushions and it would pass for a very nice boudoir!

Richard Bergquist

View more comments

For many airmen posted to the Pacific islands during the latter stages of World War Two, long periods of inactivity meant finding creative ways to offset boredom and keep up morale. Some of these ingenious ‘boredom busters’ have found their way into our collection, including this intriguing metal spinning top.

Used by Flight Lieutenant Lloyd Johns, who served in the Pacific and India, this spinning top simulates a horse race. Players bet counters against one of the six horse names engraved on the top’s sides. The player acting as the banker then spins the top with the name landing face up being the winning horse. The odds are displayed on the upper section of the top, which is detached from the base and spins independently, randomising the results. So, if the top lands on “Envoy” with odds of 6-1 the banker pays 6 counters for every 1 bet on Envoy while taking all other counters. If the top section lands on “DISQ”, disqualified, the banker takes all counters in play.

📷: Air Force Museum of New Zealand.
... See MoreSee Less

For many airmen posted to the Pacific islands during the latter stages of World War Two, long periods of inactivity meant finding creative ways to offset boredom and keep up morale. Some of these ingenious ‘boredom busters’ have found their way into our collection, including this intriguing metal spinning top.  

Used by Flight Lieutenant Lloyd Johns, who served in the Pacific and India, this spinning top simulates a horse race. Players bet counters against one of the six horse names engraved on the top’s sides. The player acting as the banker then spins the top with the name landing face up being the winning horse. The odds are displayed on the upper section of the top, which is detached from the base and spins independently, randomising the results. So, if the top lands on “Envoy” with odds of 6-1 the banker pays 6 counters for every 1 bet on Envoy while taking all other counters. If the top section lands on “DISQ”, disqualified, the banker takes all counters in play.  

📷: Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Comment on Facebook

Cool game. Just like lair dice,

I would say that it would be as popular as 2 up. Carry it around in your pocket and play any time.

I have a very similar little top but mine is one piece. It is engraved “put one , put two , all put , take one , take two ,take all”. I got it from my father and never did find out the origin.

Guess the air men must have been best buds with the machine shops

During World War Two, while most Kiwi airmen on active service overseas were either in Europe or the Pacific, some found themselves stationed in exotic West Africa. No. 490 (NZ) Squadron RAF operated out of Sierra Leone, patrolling the Atlantic Ocean for enemy shipping. After the surrender of Germany in May 1945, many of the remote RAF stations were wound down and personnel sent home. With the huge scale of the wartime RAF, though, this took time and personnel had the opportunity to do some sightseeing while they waited.

While, at this stage, we don’t know much about the service of Des Maslen, he donated a series of photographs of parts of Sierra Leone in late 1945 and 1946, which indicate that he was posted there at this time. From the context, they were simply sightseeing, because there is no military content, but the photos show what it was like in West Africa at the end of World War Two. They drove as far inland as Kabala, but mostly around the coast near the capital Freetown.

Discover more images like these in our online photo library ▶ fotoweb.airforcemuseum.co.nz/fotoweb/archives/5003-Search-the-Collection/

📸: Air Force Museum of New Zealand, Ref 2021-035.33, 2021-035.27, 2021-035.29, 2021-035.5.
... See MoreSee Less

During World War Two, while most Kiwi airmen on active service overseas were either in Europe or the Pacific, some found themselves stationed in exotic West Africa. No. 490 (NZ) Squadron RAF operated out of Sierra Leone, patrolling the Atlantic Ocean for enemy shipping. After the surrender of Germany in May 1945, many of the remote RAF stations were wound down and personnel sent home. With the huge scale of the wartime RAF, though, this took time and personnel had the opportunity to do some sightseeing while they waited.

While, at this stage, we don’t know much about the service of Des Maslen, he donated a series of photographs of parts of Sierra Leone in late 1945 and 1946, which indicate that he was posted there at this time. From the context, they were simply sightseeing, because there is no military content, but the photos show what it was like in West Africa at the end of World War Two. They drove as far inland as Kabala, but mostly around the coast near the capital Freetown.

Discover more images like these in our online photo library ▶ https://fotoweb.airforcemuseum.co.nz/fotoweb/archives/5003-Search-the-Collection/

📸: Air Force Museum of New Zealand, Ref 2021-035.33, 2021-035.27, 2021-035.29, 2021-035.5.

Comment on Facebook

Gary Walker

Liam Mclean

David Fox perhaps interesting photos

Load more
';

Open daily from 9.30am to 4.30pm (except Christmas Day)
Entry to the Museum is free, donations are appreciated.

45 Harvard Ave, Wigram, Christchurch | 03 343 9532

We welcome visitors of all abilities

black-stripe
afm-roundel